Blog

by | Jul 11, 2019

Getting To Know Adobe Illustrator

In my Vector Graphics class, we had the opportunity to pick a clock and remake it. The goals of this assignment was to get to know Illustrator and make the clock look as realistic as possible. Here is a picture of the clock that I wanted to base my design off of. Clock

After many hours of getting to know Illustrator and watching tutorials on YouTube, this was my rough draft.

Rough Draft

As you can see, I was able to figure out the body and the colors, but not the actual design to look as realistic as possible. After talking with my professor and making changes, this is how the final draft looked like:

Final Clock

Looking back on this assignment, there are many things I would have done differently. However, for my first time using illustrator, I am happy with how this clock turned out!

 

Dollar Store Light Box

Product Photography At Home Shoot.

My second favorite type of photography is product photography. I love capturing items and making them look desirable so people want them for themselves! I wanted to do a product photography shoot in my apartment to prove this can be done anywhere if you have the right resources.

As you can tell from this picture, I didn’t have the best lighting in my apartment nor resources to have a classy product photography shoot. I needed to get creative and stay within a couple dollars.

After researching, I created my own “Light Box”. This is where I photographed my product photography. The best part about it, I got ALL my supplies from the DOLLAR STORE! This was cheap and got the job done.

In order to create this light box, you need a couple of things:

  • Cardboard box
  • Construction Paper or a Paper Board
  • Tape
  • Tissue Paper or Old Fabric
  • Three lights for the sides and tops
  • Box cutter knife

Once you get the box, you cut out the top and the two sides. You place the construction paper (I chose black) in the box to create the backdrop. After that, you place the tissue paper or the old fabric in the places that you cut out. It is as easy as that! I used three lights: one for the top and two for the sides.

This was a creative, cheap and effective way to have an at home product photography shoot. Check out these final pictures!

HERE is also a video on YouTube that helps explain a similar process to create your own light box.

Dollar Store Light Box Photography Shoot Dollar Store Light Box Photography Shoot Dollar Store Light Box Photography Shoot Dollar Store Light Box Photography Shoot Dollar Store Light Box Photography Shoot Dollar Store Light Box Photography Shoot

This blog was also very helpful with tips and tricks to help create my light box.

Check it out HERE!

 

Creative Portrait Photoshoot

At Home Studio Shoot

Scrolling through Facebook or Instagram, I always see these AMAZING, creative, make-up tutorials. I could spend hours watching these videos. I have always wanted to do something crazy and creative with make-up just like all these make-up divas. Yesterday, while watching a couple of these videos, my roommates and I decided to create our own creative make-up style and capture it. However, we ran into a problem. We didn’t have a studio to take pictures of the creative make-up.

That is when I created my own “At Home Studio”. By creating this, I first had to find a plain wall. Once I moved furniture around, I created a decent space for my models to move around in. After moving furniture, I set up one speed light and one back-light. It took a couple times to adjust my models and the lights so there were not as many shadows on my models. This made the perfect at home studio and worked perfectly for the look I wanted to capture.

Lastly, I had my models do a variation of poses. I wanted a variety of poses to see which pose best suited the model and their create make-up. Portraits are my favorite form of photography because I can showcase my models personality through a picture.

Check out a couple of my favorite pictures that I got yesterday!

Creative Portrait Photography Creative Portrait Photography Creative Portrait Photography

As you can tell from these pictures, she has so many freckles! To bring out her freckles, I edited my picture in Lightroom and increased the “textures”. I love the way these turned out and how I was able to capture her beautiful freckles along with her other features.

Creative Portrait Photography Creative Portrait Photography

I love this creative, spunky make-up that helps bring out this models personality! I love the colors that help her featured POP!

Creative Portrait Photography Creative Portrait Photography Creative Portrait Photography

Check out THIS BLOG for more at home studio creative photography shoots!

 

 

TOP TEN IMAGES OF THE SEMESTER

I cannot believe how fast this semester has gone.

This class has been challenging yet, so rewarding. I would like to thank Caryn Esplin for taking the time to teach college students while she is pursuing her own photography career!

This semester, my overall goals were to identify what forms of photography I am passionate about along with finding a style that I wanted to be known for. After many photoshoots and blog posts, I have found that I love product/food photography. Product and Food Photography can be spunky, fun and unique. I love setting up the stage for my products to be places on. It is so fun to make a product look amazing and capture it in that state so other want to buy that product! Check out some examples of product and food  photography that I loved from this semester.

TOP TEN IMAGES FROM THE SEMESTER TOP TEN IMAGES FROM THE SEMESTER

TOP TEN IMAGES FROM THE SEMESTER TOP TEN IMAGES FROM THE SEMESTER

As you can tell from these photos, they same similar edits. I love bringing out the textures in my photography! Along with bringing out the textures, I love bringing out the colors but specifically the warmness of a picture. I want my photography to POP and catch your attention!

Another form of photography that I LOVED learning about was portrait photography. I love working with models and bringing out their “fun” sides. I love capturing them in their own element. Lastly, the best is when you capture a picture and the love it themselves. I feel like everyone tends to be so harm on ourselves and our outward appearances. Taking a picture that your model loves and cherishes means the world to me. Check out a couple of my favorite portraits!

TOP TEN IMAGES FROM THE SEMESTER TOP TEN IMAGES FROM THE SEMESTER

TOP TEN IMAGES FROM THE SEMESTER

TOP TEN IMAGES FROM THE SEMESTER

TOP TEN IMAGES FROM THE SEMESTER

This class was amazing. I love how my Professor was right by my side helping me capture beautiful photography. Something she talked about was using whatever we have to capture beauty. We were watching the sunrise at the Tetons and I captured this iPhone shot and it has been one of my favorite pictures since that excursion.

TOP TEN IMAGES FROM THE SEMESTER

Find the beauty around you. Find what you love and capture it.

 

Check out my friend Jacey Gilchrist blog from this semester as well. She has amazing photography!

 

Cool Landscape Shots From Around the Sky Mountain Lodge

FAPOS: Fine Art Photo Op Stops

We all have seen beautiful landscape pictures of the desert with wild cacti, sunsets that make you melt, and  mountains with snowy tops. My favorite thing about Landscape Photography is: there are multiple things you can capture to take a beautiful picture. For example, you can try different angles or you can focus on a flower that is bloomed on a cactus within the desert! Landscape photography basically captures the beauty of any scene. It can include the beauty within a landscape as well. Capturing Landscapes as easy to do! Here are some tips that will help you capture the best, amazing and cool Landscape that you desire to capture.

Here are some tips from my amazing professor Caryn Esplin

“1. Equipment: A tripod and a wide angle lens are excellent tools.  I also like to have a warming Circular Polarizer or ND filter to allow for longer exposures. This can give you the sweeping clouds/waterfalls in daylight by slowing the shutter down to blur the clouds/water. These filters will help prevent overexposed skies and give you the same effect as HDR, without as much trouble or crazy results. A polarizing filter will help remove reflections on water and make skies more vivid.

2. Settings: Use Manual with ISO 100 – 200 and aperture of f/16 – 22. In some cases, you may want some bokeh, but usually, the whole depth should be tack sharp.

3. Bracketing: Set up your 2-second timer and bracketing: 3 frames 2 stops apart. By bracketing, you will ensure to get the right exposure, so you can mask two different exposures if needed. Or you can try HDR, as long as you are careful not to let things get too surreal.

4. Picture Control: Adjust your in-camera settings to reduce post-production editing. Just increase your sharpness and saturation until you get the desired effect. Open your Menu, and look for Picture Control or Picture Style. Increase your Sats by two notches and try bumping up your Sharpness to the second highest level. However, don’t forget to turn down your sats to normal when shooting portraits.

5. Light: Lighting is everything! I shoot ninety percent of my best fine art images at sunrise and sunset. Many pros tell stories that National Geographic and others will not even consider images unless they are taken within an hour or a sunrise or sunset.

6. Focus: You must have tack-sharp images, so a sturdy tripod is a must, along with stopping down your aperture to f/16 – 22. Be sure to lock your focus about one-third of the way into your image depth. At f/16 – /22, the camera will do the rest. Take a test shot and then zoom in on your LCD, to check for focus.

7. Composition: Remember the rule of thirds and the golden ratio to get the most pleasing composition. Look for leading lines and the triangular composition. Try to avoid centering your horizon line.

8. Sun flares: You can get some sick “sunbursts” at f/22, but they will vary with different lenses. My favorite fine art lens is the 16-35mm!

9. Foreground: When possible, remind yourself to try a position that will put something interesting in the foreground. Dave Black may say “If you want to make something look interesting, only light part of it.” But I say, “If you want a beautiful fine art image, place something in the foreground.”

10. Low angle: Try varied angles. For example, drop your tripod down to the lowest possible angle for a unique vantage point. this will also help you get a more interesting foreground like flowers, grass, fences, etc.”

 

Get out today and capture the beauty around you!

Cool Landscape Shots From Around the Sky Mountain Lodge

Cool Landscape Shots From Around the Sky Mountain Lodge Cool Landscape Shots From Around the Sky Mountain Lodge Cool Landscape Shots From Around the Sky Mountain Lodge

Check out My Professor’s Photography Page for more Landscape Shots!

How To Capture Long Exposure Pictures

    Capturing Long Exposure Photography can be difficult.

Let’s tackle it together.

It is all about knowing your camera settings and having a good set-up and a creative eye! To begin with, each object that you’re shooting will differ in the settings that are required to capture it. I recommend using different settings and changing locations to get a different perspective. This was my first time light painting and I learned so much about the process and how to achieve it.

Tripod:  use a tripod
Manual Mode:  ISO 200; f/11;  30″
Focus:  With the lights on, use autofocus to lock focus, then turn lens focus to M.
Level:  Check to see if the camera is level. (tripod level as well)

Timer: Turn on your timer to 5 or 10 seconds and get in place.

Process:

Strokes:  Paint in strokes of light to show your scene.

Cool Light Painting Cool Light Painting Cool Light Painting

Check out this for more techniques to help master your Long Exposure Shots!

Golden Hour Landscapes

FAPOS: Fine Art Photo Op Stops

We all have seen beautiful landscape pictures of the desert with wild cacti, sunsets that make you melt, and  mountains with snowy tops. My favorite thing about Landscape Photography is: there are multiple things you can capture to take a beautiful picture. For example, you can try different angles or you can focus on a flower that is bloomed on a cactus within the desert! Landscape photography basically captures the beauty of any scene. It can include the beauty within a landscape as well. Capturing Landscapes as easy to do! Here are some tips that will help you capture the best, amazing and cool Landscape that you desire to capture.

These tips are from Caryn Esplin who is an amazing photography!

“1. Equipment: A tripod and a wide angle lens are excellent tools.  I also like to have a warming Circular Polarizer or ND filter to allow for longer exposures. This can give you the sweeping clouds/waterfalls in daylight by slowing the shutter down to blur the clouds/water. These filters will help prevent overexposed skies and give you the same effect as HDR, without as much trouble or crazy results. A polarizing filter will help remove reflections on water and make skies more vivid.

2. Settings: Use Manual with ISO 100 – 200 and aperture of f/16 – 22. In some cases, you may want some bokeh, but usually, the whole depth should be tack sharp.

3. Bracketing: Set up your 2-second timer and bracketing: 3 frames 2 stops apart. By bracketing, you will ensure to get the right exposure, so you can mask two different exposures if needed. Or you can try HDR, as long as you are careful not to let things get too surreal.

4. Picture Control: Adjust your in-camera settings to reduce post-production editing. Just increase your sharpness and saturation until you get the desired effect. Open your Menu, and look for Picture Control or Picture Style. Increase your Sats by two notches and try bumping up your Sharpness to the second highest level. However, don’t forget to turn down your sats to normal when shooting portraits.

5. Light: Lighting is everything! I shoot ninety percent of my best fine art images at sunrise and sunset. Many pros tell stories that National Geographic and others will not even consider images unless they are taken within an hour or a sunrise or sunset.

6. Focus: You must have tack-sharp images, so a sturdy tripod is a must, along with stopping down your aperture to f/16 – 22. Be sure to lock your focus about one-third of the way into your image depth. At f/16 – /22, the camera will do the rest. Take a test shot and then zoom in on your LCD, to check for focus.

7. Composition: Remember the rule of thirds and the golden ratio to get the most pleasing composition. Look for leading lines and the triangular composition. Try to avoid centering your horizon line.

8. Sun flares: You can get some sick “sunbursts” at f/22, but they will vary with different lenses. My favorite fine art lens is the 16-35mm!

9. Foreground: When possible, remind yourself to try a position that will put something interesting in the foreground. Dave Black may say “If you want to make something look interesting, only light part of it.” But I say, “If you want a beautiful fine art image, place something in the foreground.”

10. Low angle: Try varied angles. For example, drop your tripod down to the lowest possible angle for a unique vantage point. this will also help you get a more interesting foreground like flowers, grass, fences, etc.”

These tips helped me capture these pictures.

Get out today and capture the beauty around you!

Golden Hour Landscapes Architecture Photography Golden Hour Landscapes Golden Hour Landscapes

My favorite picture that I captured was the Landscape at the Tetons during Golden Hour!

Check out this blog for more Golden Hour Photography

Daisy’s At Sunset

Amazing Indoor Light Painting Photography

What Settings To Use For Indoor Light Paining Photography

If you are looking for opportunities to know your camera on a personal level, light painting is the best way to learn how to use your camera and the proper settings. Not only are you learning your settings in the dark, you get to paint your object and highlight what features you want captured! It is an awesome form of photography. Some tips that I learned, don’t shine the light on certain objects for too long. White objects absorb the light a lot easier than darker objects.  Use a tripod and get a unique angle.

How to do indoor light painting:

Tripod: use a tripod
Manual Mode: ISO 200; f/11;  30″
Focus:  With the lights on, use autofocus to lock focus, then turn lens focus to M.
Level:  Check to see if the camera is level. (tripod level)

Timer: Turn on your timer to 5 or 10 seconds and get in place.

Process:

Strokes:  Paint in strokes of light to show your scene.

Adjust as you go. Move your camera in a unique placement to get a different perspective. Highlight parts of the object that illustrate a story.

 

Amazing Indoor Light Photography Amazing Indoor Light Photography Amazing Indoor Light Photography Amazing Indoor Light Photography

Catch up on your indoor light painting skills by reading this blog!

How to Indoor Light Paint

 

CONCEPTUAL PRODUCT AD

Best Product Photography!

Product Photography is one of my favorite types of photography. I love capturing my favorite items and making them look amazing, as if they were in an advertisement. Every time we look in a store catalog, there are varies pictures of products that a company is trying to convince you to buy. My favorite is when products, such as soda, have water dripping off them. This makes you crave a cold, fresh soda. Product Photography is so unique. You are able to capture objects outside in their element or inside with proper lighting. That’s what makes a product so unique!

In this photo, you can’t help but crave that muffin! I think our generation is so focused on impressing others around us. Don’t get me wrong, I am all for self-improvement, but sometimes the best memories made are the ones when we forget about our insecurities. We forget about that comment our co-worker made. My grandma always says “it’s about the memories and not the calories” as she feeds us bowls of ice cream.

This photo was taken inside with a macro lens. This was taken with natural light. The product was sitting on the floor of the cabin and I took this shot standing above it. I loved the outcome and the memories I have tied to this picture!

Whitney_Boone_Best_Food

Original copy Before Edits

Set Up Shot

Set-up Shot

Check out https://mlhnphotography.com/conceptual-product-ad/ for more Conceptual Ad Ideas!

 

Amazing Product Photography

Product Photography

Best Product Photography!

Product Photography is one of my favorite types of photography. I love capturing my favorite items and making them look amazing, as if they were in an advertisement. Every time we look in a store catalog, there are varies pictures of products that a company is trying to convince you to buy. My favorite is when products, such as soda, have water dripping off them. This makes you crave a cold, fresh soda. Product Photography is so unique. You are able to capture objects outside in their element or inside with proper lighting. That’s what makes a product so unique!

Some of these products were shot outside with a low ISO. Others were shot insides with additional lighting and some flash photography. There were various techniques such as adding water to a product or someone actually using the product to help “sell” the item.

Outdoor Product Photography

Amazing shots of products taken outside.

Outdoor Photography Product Photography

Indoor Product Photography

The best pictures of products taken inside.

Amazing Product Amazing Shoe Photography Product Photography

 

Check out this blog for more tips and tricks with product photography!

 

 

 

Creative Re-make Movie Poster

Creative Movie Poster Re-Make

Growing up, I only had brothers. I never knew what it was like to live with other females besides my mother. With that said, when I went to college, living with females was another huge adjustment that I had to make. With roommates, you love some of them and can’t get along with some of them…kind of like siblings. Besides the small arguments that all roommates have, I have grown super close with my roommate. I decided to create my own version of “Step-Brothers”. In this Movie Poster, my roommate and I dressed up as dorky as we could and recreated out version of “Step-Brothers”. With a tripod, we took this picture outside before the sunset. There were multiple failures while taking this photo. I used a free use background and edited the background to somewhat match the “Step-Brothers” poster. With some free fonts from “Da-Fonts.com”, I created my own Movie Poster.

Creative Movie Poster Re-Make

Check out this blog for other creative work: michelleengberg.com

Creative Photography

Scanography

For my creative choice assignments, I wanted to capture something, on a scanner, that was near and dear to my heart. Everyday, we each endure through our own personal trials. We may never know what others are going through. However, being kind to one person may make their day. You may never know the impact you have on a stranger or loved one just by being kind. If there was one thing I could stress to the world, it would be: BE KIND.

This photo was captures on a scanner. I simply placed objects on the scanner and covered the top of it with a dark blue basket. This was a new type of photography that was fun to try!

Scanography

Story Telling Montage

For my Story Telling Montage, I captured a powerful story about a young woman. This picture shows her standing in the doorway, with a suitcase, ready to leave. In the corner you see her holding flowers crying. This picture represents how hard relationships can be sometimes. Sometimes, the best thing to do is leave a relationship. These photos were captured in the middle of the day in a barn. I lowered the ISO to capture her in the doorway.

Whitney_Boone_Creative_Photography

Check out THIS BLOG for more tips on Creative Photography!

Ordinary Spot – Extraordinary Shot

OS-ES (Ordinary Spot – Extraordinary Shot)

“People do not decide to become extraordinary. They decide to accomplish extraordinary things.” – Edmund Hillary

Some of the most beautiful photographs are those that have a unique perspective. Get down low, stand on something tall. Capture an object in a unique way. I love searching for surrounding beauty that can easily be overlooked. As we were at the Tetons, there was so much beauty surrounding me. I took the time to look at the same things such as the trees, leaves, snow and bushes that added to the beauty around me. To get pictures such as these, find everyday objects. Think of how you have normally seen these photographed. Think outside the box and capture that image in a different perspective. For example, take a picture of a tree by lying underneath it or looking through the branches. These simple tactics make your pictures stand out from the other photographers around you!

Ordinary Spot – Extraordinary Shot Ordinary Spot – Extraordinary Shot

Setting depend on where you are shooting and the light accessible. Adjust as you go.

Check out Tyler Price’s similar posts.

SQIBB – Studio Quality Invisible Black Background

Believe it or not, I took these pictures in a well lite room, in the middle of the day! This is a simple technique to get a clean background. I like using this for professional portraits. You can adjust the lights and add or subtract lights and move them around to help expose the models face.

SQIBB SQIBB SQIBB SQIBB

These portraits always turn out to be my favorite. Here’s how I accomplished capturing these pictures.

These were tips my professor, Caryn Esplin, taught the class.

 

  • Set up your camera with an
    • ISO 100, 1/200, F/22 for outside or F/8 for inside, flash white balance
  • Speedlight
    • You want off camera lighting that creates a triangle from you, your subject, and the light, be sure your trigger is charged and ready to go
  • Adjustable snoot
    • Create a “snoot” with your flash bender to funnel the light
    • Adjust the opening as needed
    • Change the power on the flash or adjust the exposure

 

Check out similar posts HERE by Kayla Taculog.

 

How to Land a Job in this Industry

Create something tangible that will set you apart from others in this industry!

In this industry, you are competing with millions of others. Everyone has their own style and their own skill set that sets them apart from each other. For my personal, tangible item, I will be creating business cards. Now, when you are handed business cards, they normally sit at the bottom of your bag or you use them for a gum wrapper. That is why I wanted to create something unique and different which reflects my brand and how I am as a creator!

 

First off, to land a job in this creative field, you need to identify what your branding and your “look” is. For myself, I choice to do creative colors that reflect Arizona since that is where I grew up. Take a look at my Branding Guide:

Branding Guide

As you can see from my Branding Guide, I have set a standard for myself as a creator.

BUSNIESS CARD

Secondly, create something that is different from the other creators around you. DON’T HAND THEM A BASIC BUSINESS CARD. I feel like everyone has the same logo these days. So, I decided to combine the styles that I liked and create my own logo. My logo is different and will stand out from the other creators around me.

Whitney Boone Business Card Example

In addition, while marketing yourself, you want to give a potential client or employer something tangible to set yourself apart from the other creators. I created these unique business cards to help set me apart. As you can see, there are different fonts that catch your attention along with a different color that many wouldn’t use in this industry because orange isn’t a popular color.

Lastly, create more that one thing to help market yourself. I have my blog, business cards and social media accounts to help market myself. In addition, for this personal style project, I wanted to create a unique business card that would completely set me apart. From the second I hand out this business card, I want it to grab their attention.

For this project, I researched the different, UNIQUE, tangible business cards that could help set me apart in this industry. On acrylic, I will be using a laser to etch my business card! The final product will look like this but with my business card design.

Whitney_Boone_Example

Get creative TODAY and creative something that sets you apart from the others in this industry!

Check out my next post to see the finished product.

5 Must-Know Portrait Photography Tips for Beginners!

These five tips for portrait photography will help your photography look like a professional instead of a beginner!

Portrait photography is my favorite type of photography. You are able to focus on your model and being their personality into the picture. I took these portraits on a trip visiting Jackson Hole and the Tetons. During this journey, I created “5 Must-Know Portrait Photography Tips for Beginners” to help those who were in the same boat as me.

  1. First off, always bring a reflector. Even if you are shooting outside in the middle of the day, you still want the light to hit your subject to help bring out those fine details.
  2. Get familiar with your location. Find a spot where others aren’t shooting in. Make sure you are in a place that has enough light but won’t over expose your subject. If you are shooting outside, the best time to shoot is right after sunrise and right before sunset.
  3. Focus on the subjects eye. If you are up-close and personal, focus your camera on one of their eyes. To take the most stunning close up portraits, you’ll want to place emphasis on the eyes. This means making sure that the eyes are sharp and have a good amount of light reflecting on them.
  4. Use Props. Especially if you’re out in nature, make your subject look like they are hiking, camping or rock climbing. This is a unique way to capture a portrait. Bringing props in your portraits adds interest to your photos and gives the audience more things to look at, even better if the props are connected to your overall theme!
  5. Lastly, Try different settings and filters on my camera. If you’re shooting with a group of people using the same settings, you all will end up with portraits that look very similar. Play with your settings and changes the filters on your camera. Try the shade filter! This will help set you apart as a portrait photographer.

Check out some of my portrait photography from this excursion. Also check out “The Best Camera Settings for Portrait Photography” to help you better understand the settings on your camera for your portrait photography.

 Whitney_Boone_Portrait_Photography_ Whitney_Boone_Portrait_Photography_Fisher_ Whitney_Boone_Portrait_Photography_Hiker_ Whitney_Boone_Portrait_Photography_Hiker_ Whitney_Boone_Portrait_Photography_Model_ Whitney_Boone_Portrait_Photography_Model Whitney_Boone_Portrait_Photography_RockClimber

 

 

Light and Dark Photography Examples

How does the lighting effect the pictures you take? Let me show you!

In these three pictures, I used three different techniques to help show you how I captured each picture and how some are more light and dark than other pictures!

Sometimes when you’re outside shooting and you get so caught up in the moment, you don’t realize the background behind you is blown out. Your subject may be in focus but, the picture is totally over exposed. Here is an example of a picture where the light is overexposed:

Light and Dark Photography example of an Overexposed Photo.

Yikes, right?! This photo is extremely light. If I were an expert with Lightroom and Photoshop,  you could make this picture look somewhat better. But, because the light is so harsh, this photo may be ruined.

Settings for overexposed photo:

Exposure: 1/125 sec

F-Stop: 5.6

ISO: 100

No flash.

Sometimes, photos turn out too dark. That is the worst! Once again, with Lightroom and Photoshop, you can try to fix these photos but they might not look as professional. Dark photos don’t allow the small details on your models to shine. The background is dark as well and won’t compliment your model. An example of a dark photo is:

Light and Dark Photography with an example of a Dark photo

Settings for Dark Photo:

Exposure: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: 20

ISO: 100

No flash.

As you can see, this photo did not turn out the way anyone wants a photo to turn out.

HOW TO FIX THIS:

Add three lights to your photoshoot! There are different techniques to help balance out light and dark in your photos. For this photo below, we had three lights that were facing him. The lights were close together on his left side. With the lights, I kept these settings:

Exposure: 1/250 sec

F-Stop: 20

ISO: 100

With the three lights and these settings, I got this picture which helped balance the light and dark in this photo!

Light and Dark Photography example with Lights

After editing this photo in Lightroom, I got this as my final result. Learning how to balance the overexposed light and underexposed dark will make the world of difference in your photography.

Whitney_Boone_Light and Dark Photography.

Check out “10 Must-Know Portrait Photography Tips for Beginners” for more tips.

Architecture Photography

Wood, Texture, Tile and Colors add to every picture you will take!

Everybody wants to be a professional photographer these days, especially wedding and portrait photographers. I bet you can go online, search “wedding photographers”, and find hundreds of wedding photographers just in your area. However, food and Architecture Photography is not saturated at all and there is a need in the market for it.

Whether it’s real estate or travel photography, the small details will add to the pictures you take. One tip for Architecture Photography is make sure to capture the details that stand out!

Architecture Photography Architecture Photography

Architecture Photography

Expert Photography has a lot of tips for Architecture Photography, check it out if you’re interested in Architecture Photography!

Architecture Photography

Architecture Photography

Architecture Photography

MAKE SURE TO CAPTURE THE DETAILS THAT STAND OUT TO YOU!

Check It Out!

Throughout this journey, I will be posting video, podcasts and regularly tweeting on our Twitter page. The goal of this is to make other more aware along with helping you and your journey with PCOS.

PCOS awareness

Check out our Twitter page that is full of information, videos and our podcast!

Make sure to watch our latest video to prepare yourself for our upcoming podcast!


GOALS

We STRIVE to help other women PREPARE, COMMUNICATE, OVERCOME and SUPPORT other women who are struggling with this piercing curse.

5 Tips to Get the Best Food Photography Pictures

How to capture the best appetizer, dessert and main course dishes:

What is one thing that everyone loves and can’t live without? FOOD!

If you were to own a restaurant, you want pictures of your food that makes your future customer’s mouth water. You want your food photography to bring in your customers instead of drive them away.

Food Photography Example Dessert Photography Example Appetizer Example

Tips to Capture the BEST Food Photography:

  1. Stage your food with lighting to help bring out the colors and textures.
  2. Place your food in an appealing way.
  3. Along with lights, use water or thicker textures to make your product look more appealing.
  4. Get your photo from eye level, high and low levels.
  5. If it doesn’t catch your eye, switch up the background or add more to your product.

Breakfast Example Photography Dessert Example Chips and Salsa Product Photography Appetizer Example Photography

Check out this blog, it offers more tips that will successfully help you capture your desired food photography pictures!

How to Capture Smoke Bomb Photography

Motion Photography Examples, Spray Bottle Photography and Smoke Bomb Photography.

Have you ever wondered how you can capture an epic portrait? Smoke Bomb Photography is one way that will set you apart from other photographers. Smoke Bomb Photography is fun, creative and colorful! With Smoke Bomb Photography, you can have someone move the smoke around your model or you can have your model hold the smoke bomb and dance around! I love the different poses you can do with a smoke bomb and how you can capture a different perspective of portraits.

Smoke Bomb Photography Smoke Bomb Photography Smoke Bomb Photography Smoke Bomb Photography

How to Capture Motion Photography:

Motion Photography can be anything from streaming water to athletes playing on the field. Motion Photography is easier to capture if you have a tripod to help keep you camera steady while it’s capturing the motion. I wanted to capture motion photography in the Ricks Garden on Brigham Young University-Idaho’s Campus. This was fairly easy to capture, here are some tips that I used to help me capture my motion photography:

  1. Use a shutter speed of 1/15 of a second or slower.
  2. Use a low ISO setting. (depends on the time of day)
  3. Use a tripod.
  4. Use a neutral density filter in bright light.
  5. Use a fast shutter speed when you want to freeze the motion of a raging river.

Motion Photography Motion Photography

Motion Photography

Another aspect of Motion Photography is Spray Photography. Photographers use this technique to help their products look more desirable and more “live”. Spray Bottle Photography is very similar to Motion Photography. However, I did not use a tripod on my Spray Bottle Photography. Spray Bottle Photography requires a fast shutter speed so it can capture the movement of the water right as it exits the Spray Bottle. This was an awesome set up and I love this photo that I got while learning Spray Bottle Photography!

Spray Bottle Photography

Check out this blog for more tips and information on Smoke Bomb Photography:

Smoke Bomb Photography: 9 Tips for Jaw Dropping Photos

How To Grow Your Art Business

Fine Art Prints

This past week, I had done something that I had never had the opportunity to do before. Have you ever walked around buildings, schools or office buildings and admired the art within those complexes?

I was able to print one of my best photos and hang it in the Communication building on Brigham Young University-Idaho! It’s a unique experience to hang your art in a beloved building on a popular campus.

Unedited, my photo looks quite lighter and doesn’t have as much detail. When editing this image and knowing I was going to print this, I needed to sharpen certain objects along with darken the wood and other elements on this photo. Adding more saturation and color will allow the photo to stand out and grab students attention as they are walking through the Spori.

How to Grow your art Business

Unedited

How to Grow Your Art Business with Fine Art Prints

Edited photo

How to Grow your Art Business

Growing your business is one of the hardest challenges artists run into. From my experience, there are a couple things to do that can help you grow your art business.

  1. Be unique. Have content that makes you stand out from the other artists around you. Have different a perspective!
  2. Get as much experience as possible. Familiarize yourself with techniques and different types of art that you aren’t as skilled in.
  3. Lastly, share your art! Print your art and donate it so your work is shown. Grow your art business by simply putting yourself out there and sharing your best work!

Growing your art business can be done in many different ways. Sharing your Fine Art Prints ,or any of  your work, can help you gain confidence and help grow your art business!

Fine Art Prints

Fine Art Prints

creative product photography ideas

Creative Product Photography Ideas

Creative, great and easy Ideas for Product Photography

Product Photography is a huge industry that will always be needed! Companies need pleasing pictures of their items in order to sell their products. There are many elements that go into product photography like colors, lighting, textures and backgrounds. We were able to shoot products that were on our models which is different from anything that I have ever done.

Some product photography can be the venue which you shoot at. We were so blessed to have the opportunity to shoot at The Venue in Rigby, Idaho.

Beautiful Space inside building Inside the Venue The Venue Inside the Venue

Some ideas include capturing:

  • Shoes
  • Clothing
  • Make-up
  • Rings
  • Items around them
  • The building itself that you’re shooting in
  • Hair
  • Watches
  • Lipstick

Make-Up Photography Formal Dress Photography Engagment Ring Shot Product Photography Shot Product Photography

From this stylized shoot, I wanted to show things that were on my models. I wanted to capture things on their bodies or accessories that added to their composition as a model. I love how the small details add to the picture as a whole.

“the sway” Blog is very informative and helped me gather ideas for my product photography shoot. Check out their blog for tips!

Female Model Photography

Female Model Photography

How to Pose Female Models.

Who runs the world? GIRLS.

Catching your models personality and beauty can be challenging at first. From my experience, I felt more comfortable and confident in my skills when I built a relationship with my models. Not only was I able to ask them to try knew things, they were able to tell me what they were comfortable with and help me catch their best angles! I wrote down a couple tips that helped me capture these beautiful models!

Bridal Shoot Fitness Photography Female Model Female Pose

Tips:

  • Get to know your models, make them feel comfortable.
  • Don’t be afraid to try knew poses.
  • Have them leave towards you.
  • Get close, get below them, try knew angles.
  • Let them guide you with their poses at first to see what they are comfortable with.
  • Lastly, bring their personality alive through your photography!
  • Compliment the models.
  • Show them picture along the way so they can fix anything if they want!

Female Model Female Fitness Photography Female Portrait Female Portrait Pose

Heather Chesky Photography has wonderful images of female photography as well! Check out her site.

How to Edit Pictures on Photoshop

How to Edit Pictures on Photoshop

As I am just starting out, I have had to teach myself how to edit images on Photoshop. Sometimes when you’re shooting, you don’t notice small things that may throw your picture off like something in the background or someone in the side of your shot. Thank goodness for Photoshop! I learned how to edit pictures in Photoshop and it still is my preferred method of editing. I don’t like adding too much color to my images unlike other photographers. Once I get more experienced and comfortable, I will add more of my own “filter” to my photos. I like my photos to look as natural and nice as possible. Something close to what you eyes are able to see!

Before Editing on Photoshop

After editing on Photoshop

When I first start to edit, I make sure there isn’t anything I need to crop out. From there, I adjust the exposure and contrast. Each photograph is different and has different needs. From there, I adjust the colors to make it fit more of my desired look. I always sharpen the image once I am finished. Here are a couple of my BEFORE and AFTER shots that I edited in Photoshop.

BEFORE EDITS

AFTER EDITS

This is one of my favorite edits that I have done thus far. I love the dark background and how the lights add to his composition. I decided to darken the background to keep the attention on my model. I sharpened his face so the subject stood out more to the audience as well.

How to Add a Texture to your Picture

Using Photoshop:

This is a task that is actually very easy to follow. I watched a video that explained how to do this on Youtube. The video link was https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ieCmMQTwHdw and he provides man different links that can help you achieve this too!

As he explains, you can edit you picture and add a texture in four easy steps

  • First, drag the background onto your picture.
  • Second, find which “Blend Mode” looks the best in your Layers Panel.
  • From here, you may adjust the settings in the “adjustment” Panel. Enhance the texture!
  • Lastly, select your main objects and mask your object.

These are easy steps that can lead to an amazing picture. This is how you edit pictures and add a texture to your picture!

How to add a texture to a picture

How to add a texture to a picture

I used this texture from www.pexels.com. This is a free use website that has a lot of textures, backgrounds and pictures! I edited this picture with this texture on Photoshop as well.

Free Use Texture

One of my favorite photographers is Reagan Blake! She has the most beautiful senior and couple shots in the sand dunes, dessert and forrest. Her instagram is @reaganblakephotography and her website is https://www.reaganblake.com

Best Male Portraits Photography

Male Poses and Portraits

Tips & Tricks on how to pose male models

Women are typically known to be more photogenic. However, when we had a studio shoot, I LOVED working with each and everyone of these males! Most of them had experience and posed themselves. Others, this was their first time. However, they each looked amazing. After my first studio shoot I came up with a list of tips and poses that can help your next photography studio shoot!

Tips:

  • Get to know your models, make them feel comfortable.
  • Get them in their element, playing sports or working out.
  • Let them guide you with their poses at first to see what they are comfortable with.
  • Males are more serious so make them laugh or catch them being happy!

How to Pose Male Models

   Male Portrait Portrait of Male Model Male Model PortraitGroom Photography

Portrait Male Model

The best portraits are the ones of males being photogenic. Help your models feel comfortable and capture their “prince charming” side! I chose to have my models pose like this because it was more of their personal choice. Some were super comfortable choosing new stances! It was awesome working with all these models and experiencing how different they all were.

AFTER EDITS 

How to Poses Males Fitness Photography

One my my favorite photographers is Rebecca Greig. Here is a link to her site with great examples of Male Photography https://news.dphotographer.co.uk/tutorials/tips-and-advice/tips-for-shooting-male-portraits/

How To Capture Beautiful Landscape Shots

Fine Art: Landscape – Nature

FAPOS: Fine Art Photo Op Stops

We all have seen beautiful landscape pictures of the desert with wild cacti, sunsets that make you melt, and  mountains with snowy tops. My favorite thing about Landscape Photography is: there are multiple things you can capture to take a beautiful picture. For example, you can try different angles or you can focus on a flower that is bloomed on a cactus within the desert! Landscape photography basically captures the beauty of any scene. It can include the beauty within a landscape as well. Capturing Landscapes as easy to do! Here are some tips that will help you capture the best, amazing and cool Landscape that you desire to capture.

These are tips from Caryn Esplin, my amazing professor. 

“1. Equipment: A tripod and a wide angle lens are excellent tools.  I also like to have a warming Circular Polarizer or ND filter to allow for longer exposures. This can give you the sweeping clouds/waterfalls in daylight by slowing the shutter down to blur the clouds/water. These filters will help prevent overexposed skies and give you the same effect as HDR, without as much trouble or crazy results. A polarizing filter will help remove reflections on water and make skies more vivid.

2. Settings: Use Manual with ISO 100 – 200 and aperture of f/16 – 22. In some cases, you may want some bokeh, but usually, the whole depth should be tack sharp.

3. Bracketing: Set up your 2-second timer and bracketing: 3 frames 2 stops apart. By bracketing, you will ensure to get the right exposure, so you can mask two different exposures if needed. Or you can try HDR, as long as you are careful not to let things get too surreal.

4. Picture Control: Adjust your in-camera settings to reduce post-production editing. Just increase your sharpness and saturation until you get the desired effect. Open your Menu, and look for Picture Control or Picture Style. Increase your Sats by two notches and try bumping up your Sharpness to the second highest level. However, don’t forget to turn down your sats to normal when shooting portraits.

5. Light: Lighting is everything! I shoot ninety percent of my best fine art images at sunrise and sunset. Many pros tell stories that National Geographic and others will not even consider images unless they are taken within an hour or a sunrise or sunset.

6. Focus: You must have tack-sharp images, so a sturdy tripod is a must, along with stopping down your aperture to f/16 – 22. Be sure to lock your focus about one-third of the way into your image depth. At f/16 – /22, the camera will do the rest. Take a test shot and then zoom in on your LCD, to check for focus.

7. Composition: Remember the rule of thirds and the golden ratio to get the most pleasing composition. Look for leading lines and the triangular composition. Try to avoid centering your horizon line.

8. Sun flares: You can get some sick “sunbursts” at f/22, but they will vary with different lenses. My favorite fine art lens is the 16-35mm!

9. Foreground: When possible, remind yourself to try a position that will put something interesting in the foreground. Dave Black may say “If you want to make something look interesting, only light part of it.” But I say, “If you want a beautiful fine art image, place something in the foreground.”

10. Low angle: Try varied angles. For example, drop your tripod down to the lowest possible angle for a unique vantage point. this will also help you get a more interesting foreground like flowers, grass, fences, etc.”

Get out today and capture the beauty around you! 

 

Creative Blog

SQIBB – Studio Quality Invisible Black Background

Believe it or not, I took these pictures in a well lite room, in the middle of the day! This is a simple technique to get a clean background. I like using this for professional portraits. You can adjust the lights and add or subtract lights and move them around to help expose the models face.

These portraits always turn out to be my favorite. Here’s how I accomplished capturing these pictures: 

  • Set up your camera with an
    • ISO 100, 1/200, F/22 for outside or F/8 for inside, flash white balance
  • Speedlight
    • You want off camera lighting that creates a triangle from you, your subject, and the light, be sure your trigger is charged and ready to go
  • Adjustable snoot
    • Create a “snoot” with your flash bender to funnel the light
    • Adjust the opening as needed
    • Change the power on the flash or adjust the exposure

 

Check out similar posts:

 http://www.kaylataculog.com/shooting-studio-photography-at-home/ by Kayla Taculog.

Great tips to getting that invisible black background!

OS-ES (Ordinary Spot – Extraordinary Shot)

“People do not decide to become extraordinary. They decide to accomplish extraordinary things.” – Edmund Hillary

Some of the most beautiful photographs are those that have a unique perspective. Get down low, stand on something tall. Capture an object in a unique way. I love searching for surrounding beauty that can easily be overlooked. As we were at the Tetons, there was so much beauty surrounding me. I took the time to look at the same things such as the trees, leaves, snow and bushes that added to the beauty around me. To get pictures such as these, find everyday objects. Think of how you have normally seen these photographed. Think outside the box and capture that image in a different perspective. For example, take a picture of a tree by lying underneath it or looking through the branches. These simple tactics make your pictures stand out from the other photographers around you!

Setting depend on where you are shooting and the light accessible. Adjust as you go.  

Check out http://www.thetylerprice.com/ordinary-spot-extraordinary-shot/ Tyler Price’s similar posts.

Welcome to my Create Blog! 

I am a Communication student studying Digital and Social Media Marketing at Brigham Young University-Idaho.

As I am approaching graduation, I created a “Style Guide” to help keep my content consistent.

As I have been studying, designing and creating for the past seven semesters, I have developed a certain style.

Since I have from Arizona, I am attracted to more warm colors and outdoorsy looks. That is where I based my style guide. I love neutral/warm colors.

The typography is a mixture of fonts that I have liked and used recently. Overtime, they will develop and change. 

Creating this Style Guide and Creative Blog will allow me to put one foot into the door of Digital and Social Media Marketing! 

Creative Choice

Scanography

For my creative choice assignments, I wanted to capture something, on a scanner, that was near and dear to my heart. Everyday, we each endure through our own personal trials. We may never know what others are going through. However, being kind to one person may make their day. You may never know the impact you have on a stranger or loved one just by being kind. If there was one thing I could stress to the world, it would be: BE KIND. 

This photo was captures on a scanner. I simply placed objects on the scanner and covered the top of it with a dark blue basket. This was a new type of photography that was fun to try! 

Story Telling Montage

For my Story Telling Montage, I captured a powerful story about a young woman. This picture shows her standing in the doorway, with a suitcase, ready to leave. In the corner you see her holding flowers crying. This picture represents how hard relationships can be sometimes. Sometimes, the best thing to do is leave a relationship. These photos were captured in the middle of the day in a barn. I lowered the ISO to capture her in the doorway. 

Creative Movie Poster Re-Make

Growing up, I only had brothers. I never knew what it was like to live with other females besides my mother. With that said, when I went to college, living with females was another huge adjustment that I had to make. With roommates, you love some of them and can’t get along with some of them…kind of like siblings. Besides the small arguments that all roommates have, I have grown super close with my roommate. I decided to create my own version of “Step-Brothers”. In this Movie Poster, my roommate and I dressed up as dorky as we could and recreated out version of “Step-Brothers”. With a tripod, we took this picture outside before the sunset. There were multiple failures while taking this photo. I used a free use background and edited the background to somewhat match the “Step-Brothers” poster. With some free fonts from “Da-Fonts.com”, I created my own Movie Poster.

Product Photography

Best Product Photography!   

Product Photography is one of my favorite types of photography. I love capturing my favorite items and making them look amazing, as if they were in an advertisement. Every time we look in a store catalog, there are varies pictures of products that a company is trying to convince you to buy. My favorite is when products, such as soda, have water dripping off them. This makes you crave a cold, fresh soda. Product Photography is so unique. You are able to capture objects outside in their element or inside with proper lighting. That’s what makes a product so unique! 

Some of these products were shot outside with a low ISO. Others were shot insides with additional lighting and some flash photography. There were various techniques such as adding water to a product or someone actually using the product to help “sell” the item. 

Outdoor Product Photography 

Amazing shots of products taken outside. 

  

 

 

Indoor Product Photography 

The best pictures of products taken inside. 

  

 

 

CONCEPTUAL PRODUCT AD

Best Product Photography!   

Product Photography is one of my favorite types of photography. I love capturing my favorite items and making them look amazing, as if they were in an advertisement. Every time we look in a store catalog, there are varies pictures of products that a company is trying to convince you to buy. My favorite is when products, such as soda, have water dripping off them. This makes you crave a cold, fresh soda. Product Photography is so unique. You are able to capture objects outside in their element or inside with proper lighting. That’s what makes a product so unique! 

In this photo, you can’t help but crave that muffin! I think our generation is so focused on impressing others around us. Don’t get me wrong, I am all for self-improvement, but sometimes the best memories made are the ones when we forget about our insecurities. We forget about that comment our co-worker made. My grandma always says “it’s about the memories and not the calories” as she feeds us bowls of ice cream. 

This photo was taken inside with a macro lens. This was taken with natural light. The product was sitting on the floor of the cabin and I took this shot standing above it. I loved the outcome and the memories I have tied to this picture! 

Indoor Light Paining Photography

If you are looking for opportunities to know your camera on a personal level, light painting is the best way to learn how to use your camera and the proper settings. Not only are you learning your settings in the dark, you get to paint your object and highlight what features you want captured! It is an awesome form of photography. Some tips that I learned, don’t shine the light on certain objects for too long. White objects absorb the light a lot easier than darker objects.  Use a tripod and get a unique angle. 

How to do indoor light painting: 

Setup:

Tripod:  Always use a tripod
Manual Mode:  Baseline Settings: ISO 200; f/11;  30″
Focus:  With the lights on, use autofocus to lock focus, then turn lens focus to M.
Level:  Check to see if the camera is level. Timer: Turn on your timer to 5 or 10 seconds and get in place.

Process:

Strokes:  Paint in strokes of light to reveal your scene.

Adjust as you go. Move your camera in a unique placement to get a different perspective. Highlight parts of the object that illustrate a story. 

 

How to Capture Long Exposure Photography: 

    

Capturing Long Exposure Photography can be difficult. It is all about knowing your camera settings and having a good set-up and a creative eye! To begin with, each object that you’re shooting will differ in the settings that are required to capture it. I recommend using different settings and changing locations to get a different perspective. This was my first time light painting and I learned so much about the process and how to achieve it. 

Tripod:  Always use a tripod
Manual Mode:  Baseline Settings: ISO 200; f/11;  30″
Focus:  With the lights on, use autofocus to lock focus, then turn lens focus to M.
Level:  Check to see if the camera is level. Timer: Turn on your timer to 5 or 10 seconds and get in place.

Process:

Strokes:  Paint in strokes of light to reveal your scene.

Fine Art: Landscape – Nature

FAPOS: Fine Art Photo Op Stops

We all have seen beautiful landscape pictures of the desert with wild cacti, sunsets that make you melt, and  mountains with snowy tops. My favorite thing about Landscape Photography is: there are multiple things you can capture to take a beautiful picture. For example, you can try different angles or you can focus on a flower that is bloomed on a cactus within the desert! Landscape photography basically captures the beauty of any scene. It can include the beauty within a landscape as well. Capturing Landscapes as easy to do! Here are some tips that will help you capture the best, amazing and cool Landscape that you desire to capture: 

1. Equipment: A tripod and a wide angle lens are excellent tools.  I also like to have a warming Circular Polarizer or ND filter to allow for longer exposures. This can give you the sweeping clouds/waterfalls in daylight by slowing the shutter down to blur the clouds/water. These filters will help prevent overexposed skies and give you the same effect as HDR, without as much trouble or crazy results. A polarizing filter will help remove reflections on water and make skies more vivid.

2. Settings: Use Manual with ISO 100 – 200 and aperture of f/16 – 22. In some cases, you may want some bokeh, but usually, the whole depth should be tack sharp.

3. Bracketing: Set up your 2-second timer and bracketing: 3 frames 2 stops apart. By bracketing, you will ensure to get the right exposure, so you can mask two different exposures if needed. Or you can try HDR, as long as you are careful not to let things get too surreal.

4. Picture Control: Adjust your in-camera settings to reduce post-production editing. Just increase your sharpness and saturation until you get the desired effect. Open your Menu, and look for Picture Control or Picture Style. Increase your Sats by two notches and try bumping up your Sharpness to the second highest level. However, don’t forget to turn down your sats to normal when shooting portraits.

5. Light: Lighting is everything! I shoot ninety percent of my best fine art images at sunrise and sunset. Many pros tell stories that National Geographic and others will not even consider images unless they are taken within an hour or a sunrise or sunset.

6. Focus: You must have tack-sharp images, so a sturdy tripod is a must, along with stopping down your aperture to f/16 – 22. Be sure to lock your focus about one-third of the way into your image depth. At f/16 – /22, the camera will do the rest. Take a test shot and then zoom in on your LCD, to check for focus.

7. Composition: Remember the rule of thirds and the golden ratio to get the most pleasing composition. Look for leading lines and the triangular composition. Try to avoid centering your horizon line.

8. Sun flares: You can get some sick “sunbursts” at f/22, but they will vary with different lenses. My favorite fine art lens is the 16-35mm!

9. Foreground: When possible, remind yourself to try a position that will put something interesting in the foreground. Dave Black may say “If you want to make something look interesting, only light part of it.” But I say, “If you want a beautiful fine art image, place something in the foreground.”

10. Low angle: Try varied angles. For example, drop your tripod down to the lowest possible angle for a unique vantage point. this will also help you get a more interesting foreground like flowers, grass, fences, etc.

 

Get out today and capture the beauty around you! 

 

 

Cool Landscape Shots From Around the Lodge

FAPOS: Fine Art Photo Op Stops

We all have seen beautiful landscape pictures of the desert with wild cacti, sunsets that make you melt, and  mountains with snowy tops. My favorite thing about Landscape Photography is: there are multiple things you can capture to take a beautiful picture. For example, you can try different angles or you can focus on a flower that is bloomed on a cactus within the desert! Landscape photography basically captures the beauty of any scene. It can include the beauty within a landscape as well. Capturing Landscapes as easy to do! Here are some tips that will help you capture the best, amazing and cool Landscape that you desire to capture: 

1. Equipment: A tripod and a wide angle lens are excellent tools.  I also like to have a warming Circular Polarizer or ND filter to allow for longer exposures. This can give you the sweeping clouds/waterfalls in daylight by slowing the shutter down to blur the clouds/water. These filters will help prevent overexposed skies and give you the same effect as HDR, without as much trouble or crazy results. A polarizing filter will help remove reflections on water and make skies more vivid.

2. Settings: Use Manual with ISO 100 – 200 and aperture of f/16 – 22. In some cases, you may want some bokeh, but usually, the whole depth should be tack sharp.

3. Bracketing: Set up your 2-second timer and bracketing: 3 frames 2 stops apart. By bracketing, you will ensure to get the right exposure, so you can mask two different exposures if needed. Or you can try HDR, as long as you are careful not to let things get too surreal.

4. Picture Control: Adjust your in-camera settings to reduce post-production editing. Just increase your sharpness and saturation until you get the desired effect. Open your Menu, and look for Picture Control or Picture Style. Increase your Sats by two notches and try bumping up your Sharpness to the second highest level. However, don’t forget to turn down your sats to normal when shooting portraits.

5. Light: Lighting is everything! I shoot ninety percent of my best fine art images at sunrise and sunset. Many pros tell stories that National Geographic and others will not even consider images unless they are taken within an hour or a sunrise or sunset.

6. Focus: You must have tack-sharp images, so a sturdy tripod is a must, along with stopping down your aperture to f/16 – 22. Be sure to lock your focus about one-third of the way into your image depth. At f/16 – /22, the camera will do the rest. Take a test shot and then zoom in on your LCD, to check for focus.

7. Composition: Remember the rule of thirds and the golden ratio to get the most pleasing composition. Look for leading lines and the triangular composition. Try to avoid centering your horizon line.

8. Sun flares: You can get some sick “sunbursts” at f/22, but they will vary with different lenses. My favorite fine art lens is the 16-35mm!

9. Foreground: When possible, remind yourself to try a position that will put something interesting in the foreground. Dave Black may say “If you want to make something look interesting, only light part of it.” But I say, “If you want a beautiful fine art image, place something in the foreground.”

10. Low angle: Try varied angles. For example, drop your tripod down to the lowest possible angle for a unique vantage point. this will also help you get a more interesting foreground like flowers, grass, fences, etc.

 

Get out today and capture the beauty around you! 

Golden Hour Landscapes

FAPOS: Fine Art Photo Op Stops

We all have seen beautiful landscape pictures of the desert with wild cacti, sunsets that make you melt, and  mountains with snowy tops. My favorite thing about Landscape Photography is: there are multiple things you can capture to take a beautiful picture. For example, you can try different angles or you can focus on a flower that is bloomed on a cactus within the desert! Landscape photography basically captures the beauty of any scene. It can include the beauty within a landscape as well. Capturing Landscapes as easy to do! Here are some tips that will help you capture the best, amazing and cool Landscape that you desire to capture: 

1. Equipment: A tripod and a wide angle lens are excellent tools.  I also like to have a warming Circular Polarizer or ND filter to allow for longer exposures. This can give you the sweeping clouds/waterfalls in daylight by slowing the shutter down to blur the clouds/water. These filters will help prevent overexposed skies and give you the same effect as HDR, without as much trouble or crazy results. A polarizing filter will help remove reflections on water and make skies more vivid.

2. Settings: Use Manual with ISO 100 – 200 and aperture of f/16 – 22. In some cases, you may want some bokeh, but usually, the whole depth should be tack sharp.

3. Bracketing: Set up your 2-second timer and bracketing: 3 frames 2 stops apart. By bracketing, you will ensure to get the right exposure, so you can mask two different exposures if needed. Or you can try HDR, as long as you are careful not to let things get too surreal.

4. Picture Control: Adjust your in-camera settings to reduce post-production editing. Just increase your sharpness and saturation until you get the desired effect. Open your Menu, and look for Picture Control or Picture Style. Increase your Sats by two notches and try bumping up your Sharpness to the second highest level. However, don’t forget to turn down your sats to normal when shooting portraits.

5. Light: Lighting is everything! I shoot ninety percent of my best fine art images at sunrise and sunset. Many pros tell stories that National Geographic and others will not even consider images unless they are taken within an hour or a sunrise or sunset.

6. Focus: You must have tack-sharp images, so a sturdy tripod is a must, along with stopping down your aperture to f/16 – 22. Be sure to lock your focus about one-third of the way into your image depth. At f/16 – /22, the camera will do the rest. Take a test shot and then zoom in on your LCD, to check for focus.

7. Composition: Remember the rule of thirds and the golden ratio to get the most pleasing composition. Look for leading lines and the triangular composition. Try to avoid centering your horizon line.

8. Sun flares: You can get some sick “sunbursts” at f/22, but they will vary with different lenses. My favorite fine art lens is the 16-35mm!

9. Foreground: When possible, remind yourself to try a position that will put something interesting in the foreground. Dave Black may say “If you want to make something look interesting, only light part of it.” But I say, “If you want a beautiful fine art image, place something in the foreground.”

10. Low angle: Try varied angles. For example, drop your tripod down to the lowest possible angle for a unique vantage point. this will also help you get a more interesting foreground like flowers, grass, fences, etc.

 

Get out today and capture the beauty around you! 

Best Male Photography Tips

The Venue: Studio Shoot

Women are typically known to be more photogenic. However, when we had a studio shoot, I LOVED working with each and everyone of these males! Most of them had experience and posed themselves. Others, this was their first time. However, they each looked amazing. After my first studio shoot I came up with a list of tips and poses that can help your next photography studio shoot!

Tips:

  • Get to know your models, make them feel comfortable.
  • Don’t be afraid to try knew poses.
  • Have them leave towards you.
  • Get close, get below them, try knew angles.
  • Let them guide you with their poses at first to see what they are comfortable with.
  • Lastly, bring their personality alive through your photography!

 

Female Model Photography

How to Pose Female Models.

Who runs the world? GIRLS.

Catching your models personality and beauty can be challenging at first. From my experience, I felt more comfortable and confident in my skills when I built a relationship with my models. Not only was I able to ask them to try knew things, they were able to tell me what they were comfortable with and help me catch their best angles! I wrote down a couple tips that helped me capture these beautiful models!

Tips:

  • Get to know your models, make them feel comfortable.
  • Don’t be afraid to try knew poses.
  • Have them leave towards you.
  • Get close, get below them, try knew angles.
  • Let them guide you with their poses at first to see what they are comfortable with.
  • Lastly, bring their personality alive through your photography!
  • Compliment the models.
  • Show them picture along the way so they can fix anything if they want!