SQIBB – Studio Quality Invisible Black Background

Believe it or not, I took these pictures in a well lite room, in the middle of the day! This is a simple technique to get a clean background. I like using this for professional portraits. You can adjust the lights and add or subtract lights and move them around to help expose the models face.

These portraits always turn out to be my favorite. Here’s how I accomplished capturing these pictures: 

  • Set up your camera with an
    • ISO 100, 1/200, F/22 for outside or F/8 for inside, flash white balance
  • Speedlight
    • You want off camera lighting that creates a triangle from you, your subject, and the light, be sure your trigger is charged and ready to go
  • Adjustable snoot
    • Create a “snoot” with your flash bender to funnel the light
    • Adjust the opening as needed
    • Change the power on the flash or adjust the exposure

 

Check out similar posts:

 http://www.kaylataculog.com/shooting-studio-photography-at-home/ by Kayla Taculog.

Great tips to getting that invisible black background!

OS-ES (Ordinary Spot – Extraordinary Shot)

“People do not decide to become extraordinary. They decide to accomplish extraordinary things.” – Edmund Hillary

Some of the most beautiful photographs are those that have a unique perspective. Get down low, stand on something tall. Capture an object in a unique way. I love searching for surrounding beauty that can easily be overlooked. As we were at the Tetons, there was so much beauty surrounding me. I took the time to look at the same things such as the trees, leaves, snow and bushes that added to the beauty around me. To get pictures such as these, find everyday objects. Think of how you have normally seen these photographed. Think outside the box and capture that image in a different perspective. For example, take a picture of a tree by lying underneath it or looking through the branches. These simple tactics make your pictures stand out from the other photographers around you!

Setting depend on where you are shooting and the light accessible. Adjust as you go.  

Check out http://www.thetylerprice.com/ordinary-spot-extraordinary-shot/ Tyler Price’s similar posts.

Welcome to my Create Blog! 

I am a Communication student studying Digital and Social Media Marketing at Brigham Young University-Idaho.

As I am approaching graduation, I created a “Style Guide” to help keep my content consistent.

As I have been studying, designing and creating for the past seven semesters, I have developed a certain style.

Since I have from Arizona, I am attracted to more warm colors and outdoorsy looks. That is where I based my style guide. I love neutral/warm colors.

The typography is a mixture of fonts that I have liked and used recently. Overtime, they will develop and change. 

Creating this Style Guide and Creative Blog will allow me to put one foot into the door of Digital and Social Media Marketing! 

Creative Choice

Scanography

For my creative choice assignments, I wanted to capture something, on a scanner, that was near and dear to my heart. Everyday, we each endure through our own personal trials. We may never know what others are going through. However, being kind to one person may make their day. You may never know the impact you have on a stranger or loved one just by being kind. If there was one thing I could stress to the world, it would be: BE KIND. 

This photo was captures on a scanner. I simply placed objects on the scanner and covered the top of it with a dark blue basket. This was a new type of photography that was fun to try! 

Story Telling Montage

For my Story Telling Montage, I captured a powerful story about a young woman. This picture shows her standing in the doorway, with a suitcase, ready to leave. In the corner you see her holding flowers crying. This picture represents how hard relationships can be sometimes. Sometimes, the best thing to do is leave a relationship. These photos were captured in the middle of the day in a barn. I lowered the ISO to capture her in the doorway. 

Creative Movie Poster Re-Make

Growing up, I only had brothers. I never knew what it was like to live with other females besides my mother. With that said, when I went to college, living with females was another huge adjustment that I had to make. With roommates, you love some of them and can’t get along with some of them…kind of like siblings. Besides the small arguments that all roommates have, I have grown super close with my roommate. I decided to create my own version of “Step-Brothers”. In this Movie Poster, my roommate and I dressed up as dorky as we could and recreated out version of “Step-Brothers”. With a tripod, we took this picture outside before the sunset. There were multiple failures while taking this photo. I used a free use background and edited the background to somewhat match the “Step-Brothers” poster. With some free fonts from “Da-Fonts.com”, I created my own Movie Poster.

Product Photography

Best Product Photography!   

Product Photography is one of my favorite types of photography. I love capturing my favorite items and making them look amazing, as if they were in an advertisement. Every time we look in a store catalog, there are varies pictures of products that a company is trying to convince you to buy. My favorite is when products, such as soda, have water dripping off them. This makes you crave a cold, fresh soda. Product Photography is so unique. You are able to capture objects outside in their element or inside with proper lighting. That’s what makes a product so unique! 

Some of these products were shot outside with a low ISO. Others were shot insides with additional lighting and some flash photography. There were various techniques such as adding water to a product or someone actually using the product to help “sell” the item. 

Outdoor Product Photography 

Amazing shots of products taken outside. 

  

 

 

Indoor Product Photography 

The best pictures of products taken inside. 

  

 

 

CONCEPTUAL PRODUCT AD

Best Product Photography!   

Product Photography is one of my favorite types of photography. I love capturing my favorite items and making them look amazing, as if they were in an advertisement. Every time we look in a store catalog, there are varies pictures of products that a company is trying to convince you to buy. My favorite is when products, such as soda, have water dripping off them. This makes you crave a cold, fresh soda. Product Photography is so unique. You are able to capture objects outside in their element or inside with proper lighting. That’s what makes a product so unique! 

In this photo, you can’t help but crave that muffin! I think our generation is so focused on impressing others around us. Don’t get me wrong, I am all for self-improvement, but sometimes the best memories made are the ones when we forget about our insecurities. We forget about that comment our co-worker made. My grandma always says “it’s about the memories and not the calories” as she feeds us bowls of ice cream. 

This photo was taken inside with a macro lens. This was taken with natural light. The product was sitting on the floor of the cabin and I took this shot standing above it. I loved the outcome and the memories I have tied to this picture! 

Indoor Light Paining Photography

If you are looking for opportunities to know your camera on a personal level, light painting is the best way to learn how to use your camera and the proper settings. Not only are you learning your settings in the dark, you get to paint your object and highlight what features you want captured! It is an awesome form of photography. Some tips that I learned, don’t shine the light on certain objects for too long. White objects absorb the light a lot easier than darker objects.  Use a tripod and get a unique angle. 

How to do indoor light painting: 

Setup:

Tripod:  Always use a tripod
Manual Mode:  Baseline Settings: ISO 200; f/11;  30″
Focus:  With the lights on, use autofocus to lock focus, then turn lens focus to M.
Level:  Check to see if the camera is level. Timer: Turn on your timer to 5 or 10 seconds and get in place.

Process:

Strokes:  Paint in strokes of light to reveal your scene.

Adjust as you go. Move your camera in a unique placement to get a different perspective. Highlight parts of the object that illustrate a story. 

 

How to Capture Long Exposure Photography: 

    

Capturing Long Exposure Photography can be difficult. It is all about knowing your camera settings and having a good set-up and a creative eye! To begin with, each object that you’re shooting will differ in the settings that are required to capture it. I recommend using different settings and changing locations to get a different perspective. This was my first time light painting and I learned so much about the process and how to achieve it. 

Tripod:  Always use a tripod
Manual Mode:  Baseline Settings: ISO 200; f/11;  30″
Focus:  With the lights on, use autofocus to lock focus, then turn lens focus to M.
Level:  Check to see if the camera is level. Timer: Turn on your timer to 5 or 10 seconds and get in place.

Process:

Strokes:  Paint in strokes of light to reveal your scene.

Fine Art: Landscape – Nature

FAPOS: Fine Art Photo Op Stops

We all have seen beautiful landscape pictures of the desert with wild cacti, sunsets that make you melt, and  mountains with snowy tops. My favorite thing about Landscape Photography is: there are multiple things you can capture to take a beautiful picture. For example, you can try different angles or you can focus on a flower that is bloomed on a cactus within the desert! Landscape photography basically captures the beauty of any scene. It can include the beauty within a landscape as well. Capturing Landscapes as easy to do! Here are some tips that will help you capture the best, amazing and cool Landscape that you desire to capture: 

1. Equipment: A tripod and a wide angle lens are excellent tools.  I also like to have a warming Circular Polarizer or ND filter to allow for longer exposures. This can give you the sweeping clouds/waterfalls in daylight by slowing the shutter down to blur the clouds/water. These filters will help prevent overexposed skies and give you the same effect as HDR, without as much trouble or crazy results. A polarizing filter will help remove reflections on water and make skies more vivid.

2. Settings: Use Manual with ISO 100 – 200 and aperture of f/16 – 22. In some cases, you may want some bokeh, but usually, the whole depth should be tack sharp.

3. Bracketing: Set up your 2-second timer and bracketing: 3 frames 2 stops apart. By bracketing, you will ensure to get the right exposure, so you can mask two different exposures if needed. Or you can try HDR, as long as you are careful not to let things get too surreal.

4. Picture Control: Adjust your in-camera settings to reduce post-production editing. Just increase your sharpness and saturation until you get the desired effect. Open your Menu, and look for Picture Control or Picture Style. Increase your Sats by two notches and try bumping up your Sharpness to the second highest level. However, don’t forget to turn down your sats to normal when shooting portraits.

5. Light: Lighting is everything! I shoot ninety percent of my best fine art images at sunrise and sunset. Many pros tell stories that National Geographic and others will not even consider images unless they are taken within an hour or a sunrise or sunset.

6. Focus: You must have tack-sharp images, so a sturdy tripod is a must, along with stopping down your aperture to f/16 – 22. Be sure to lock your focus about one-third of the way into your image depth. At f/16 – /22, the camera will do the rest. Take a test shot and then zoom in on your LCD, to check for focus.

7. Composition: Remember the rule of thirds and the golden ratio to get the most pleasing composition. Look for leading lines and the triangular composition. Try to avoid centering your horizon line.

8. Sun flares: You can get some sick “sunbursts” at f/22, but they will vary with different lenses. My favorite fine art lens is the 16-35mm!

9. Foreground: When possible, remind yourself to try a position that will put something interesting in the foreground. Dave Black may say “If you want to make something look interesting, only light part of it.” But I say, “If you want a beautiful fine art image, place something in the foreground.”

10. Low angle: Try varied angles. For example, drop your tripod down to the lowest possible angle for a unique vantage point. this will also help you get a more interesting foreground like flowers, grass, fences, etc.

 

Get out today and capture the beauty around you! 

 

 

Cool Landscape Shots From Around the Lodge

FAPOS: Fine Art Photo Op Stops

We all have seen beautiful landscape pictures of the desert with wild cacti, sunsets that make you melt, and  mountains with snowy tops. My favorite thing about Landscape Photography is: there are multiple things you can capture to take a beautiful picture. For example, you can try different angles or you can focus on a flower that is bloomed on a cactus within the desert! Landscape photography basically captures the beauty of any scene. It can include the beauty within a landscape as well. Capturing Landscapes as easy to do! Here are some tips that will help you capture the best, amazing and cool Landscape that you desire to capture: 

1. Equipment: A tripod and a wide angle lens are excellent tools.  I also like to have a warming Circular Polarizer or ND filter to allow for longer exposures. This can give you the sweeping clouds/waterfalls in daylight by slowing the shutter down to blur the clouds/water. These filters will help prevent overexposed skies and give you the same effect as HDR, without as much trouble or crazy results. A polarizing filter will help remove reflections on water and make skies more vivid.

2. Settings: Use Manual with ISO 100 – 200 and aperture of f/16 – 22. In some cases, you may want some bokeh, but usually, the whole depth should be tack sharp.

3. Bracketing: Set up your 2-second timer and bracketing: 3 frames 2 stops apart. By bracketing, you will ensure to get the right exposure, so you can mask two different exposures if needed. Or you can try HDR, as long as you are careful not to let things get too surreal.

4. Picture Control: Adjust your in-camera settings to reduce post-production editing. Just increase your sharpness and saturation until you get the desired effect. Open your Menu, and look for Picture Control or Picture Style. Increase your Sats by two notches and try bumping up your Sharpness to the second highest level. However, don’t forget to turn down your sats to normal when shooting portraits.

5. Light: Lighting is everything! I shoot ninety percent of my best fine art images at sunrise and sunset. Many pros tell stories that National Geographic and others will not even consider images unless they are taken within an hour or a sunrise or sunset.

6. Focus: You must have tack-sharp images, so a sturdy tripod is a must, along with stopping down your aperture to f/16 – 22. Be sure to lock your focus about one-third of the way into your image depth. At f/16 – /22, the camera will do the rest. Take a test shot and then zoom in on your LCD, to check for focus.

7. Composition: Remember the rule of thirds and the golden ratio to get the most pleasing composition. Look for leading lines and the triangular composition. Try to avoid centering your horizon line.

8. Sun flares: You can get some sick “sunbursts” at f/22, but they will vary with different lenses. My favorite fine art lens is the 16-35mm!

9. Foreground: When possible, remind yourself to try a position that will put something interesting in the foreground. Dave Black may say “If you want to make something look interesting, only light part of it.” But I say, “If you want a beautiful fine art image, place something in the foreground.”

10. Low angle: Try varied angles. For example, drop your tripod down to the lowest possible angle for a unique vantage point. this will also help you get a more interesting foreground like flowers, grass, fences, etc.

 

Get out today and capture the beauty around you! 

Golden Hour Landscapes

FAPOS: Fine Art Photo Op Stops

We all have seen beautiful landscape pictures of the desert with wild cacti, sunsets that make you melt, and  mountains with snowy tops. My favorite thing about Landscape Photography is: there are multiple things you can capture to take a beautiful picture. For example, you can try different angles or you can focus on a flower that is bloomed on a cactus within the desert! Landscape photography basically captures the beauty of any scene. It can include the beauty within a landscape as well. Capturing Landscapes as easy to do! Here are some tips that will help you capture the best, amazing and cool Landscape that you desire to capture: 

1. Equipment: A tripod and a wide angle lens are excellent tools.  I also like to have a warming Circular Polarizer or ND filter to allow for longer exposures. This can give you the sweeping clouds/waterfalls in daylight by slowing the shutter down to blur the clouds/water. These filters will help prevent overexposed skies and give you the same effect as HDR, without as much trouble or crazy results. A polarizing filter will help remove reflections on water and make skies more vivid.

2. Settings: Use Manual with ISO 100 – 200 and aperture of f/16 – 22. In some cases, you may want some bokeh, but usually, the whole depth should be tack sharp.

3. Bracketing: Set up your 2-second timer and bracketing: 3 frames 2 stops apart. By bracketing, you will ensure to get the right exposure, so you can mask two different exposures if needed. Or you can try HDR, as long as you are careful not to let things get too surreal.

4. Picture Control: Adjust your in-camera settings to reduce post-production editing. Just increase your sharpness and saturation until you get the desired effect. Open your Menu, and look for Picture Control or Picture Style. Increase your Sats by two notches and try bumping up your Sharpness to the second highest level. However, don’t forget to turn down your sats to normal when shooting portraits.

5. Light: Lighting is everything! I shoot ninety percent of my best fine art images at sunrise and sunset. Many pros tell stories that National Geographic and others will not even consider images unless they are taken within an hour or a sunrise or sunset.

6. Focus: You must have tack-sharp images, so a sturdy tripod is a must, along with stopping down your aperture to f/16 – 22. Be sure to lock your focus about one-third of the way into your image depth. At f/16 – /22, the camera will do the rest. Take a test shot and then zoom in on your LCD, to check for focus.

7. Composition: Remember the rule of thirds and the golden ratio to get the most pleasing composition. Look for leading lines and the triangular composition. Try to avoid centering your horizon line.

8. Sun flares: You can get some sick “sunbursts” at f/22, but they will vary with different lenses. My favorite fine art lens is the 16-35mm!

9. Foreground: When possible, remind yourself to try a position that will put something interesting in the foreground. Dave Black may say “If you want to make something look interesting, only light part of it.” But I say, “If you want a beautiful fine art image, place something in the foreground.”

10. Low angle: Try varied angles. For example, drop your tripod down to the lowest possible angle for a unique vantage point. this will also help you get a more interesting foreground like flowers, grass, fences, etc.

 

Get out today and capture the beauty around you! 

Best Male Photography Tips

The Venue: Studio Shoot

Women are typically known to be more photogenic. However, when we had a studio shoot, I LOVED working with each and everyone of these males! Most of them had experience and posed themselves. Others, this was their first time. However, they each looked amazing. After my first studio shoot I came up with a list of tips and poses that can help your next photography studio shoot!

Tips:

  • Get to know your models, make them feel comfortable.
  • Don’t be afraid to try knew poses.
  • Have them leave towards you.
  • Get close, get below them, try knew angles.
  • Let them guide you with their poses at first to see what they are comfortable with.
  • Lastly, bring their personality alive through your photography!

 

Female Model Photography

How to Pose Female Models.

Who runs the world? GIRLS.

Catching your models personality and beauty can be challenging at first. From my experience, I felt more comfortable and confident in my skills when I built a relationship with my models. Not only was I able to ask them to try knew things, they were able to tell me what they were comfortable with and help me catch their best angles! I wrote down a couple tips that helped me capture these beautiful models!

Tips:

  • Get to know your models, make them feel comfortable.
  • Don’t be afraid to try knew poses.
  • Have them leave towards you.
  • Get close, get below them, try knew angles.
  • Let them guide you with their poses at first to see what they are comfortable with.
  • Lastly, bring their personality alive through your photography!
  • Compliment the models.
  • Show them picture along the way so they can fix anything if they want!